Songs, TABs and Song Chord Progressions for Ukulele

Popular songs and progressions with TABs, Play-along Tracks, sample chords and related song information.

Available Songs

uke_band_jazzEach song has a PDF chart, either hand written or prepared using a professional music software notation program. Example chords are shown for songs with simpler basic chords.

Links to the songs lyrics, videos and related song information are included.

Here are a few featured songs.

Has Written Music and/or TAB Has Lead Sheet Has Play-along Track

  • A Child is Born

    A Child is Born - An arrangement of this standard for ukulele in "C" tuning G C E A, with a low "G". suitable for performance on standard high "G" C tuning.

  • A Foggy Day

    A Foggy Day is a song composed by George Gershwin, with lyrics by Ira Gershwin, introduced by Fred Astaire in the 1937 film A Damsel in Distress. It was originally titled "A Foggy Day (In London Town)", and is often still referred to as such.

  • All My Loving

    All My Loving is a song by the Beatles, written by Paul McCartney (credited to Lennon–McCartney), from the 1963 album With The Beatles. Though it was not released as a single in the United Kingdom or the United States, it drew considerable radio airplay, prompting EMI to issue it as the title track of an EP. The song was released as a single in Canada, where it became a number one hit. The Canadian single was imported into the US in enough quantities to peak at number 45 on the Billboard Hot 100 in April 1964.

  • All of Me

    All of Me is a popular song and jazz standard written by Gerald Marks and Seymour Simons in 1931. First performed by Belle Baker over the radio and recorded in December 1931 by Ruth Etting, it has become one of the most recorded songs of its era, with notable versions by Billie Holiday, Louis Armstrong, Mildred Bailey, Benny Goodman, Teddy Wilson in 1941, The Count Basie Orchestra, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Dean Martin and Frank Sinatra.

  • All The Things You Are

    All The Things You Are is a song composed by Jerome Kern, with lyrics written by Oscar Hammerstein II. It was written for the musical Very Warm for May (1939), where it was introduced by Hiram Sherman, Frances Mercer, Hollace Shaw, and Ralph Stuart. It was later featured in the film Broadway Rhythm (1944), and was performed during the opening credits and as a recurring theme for the romantic comedy A Letter for Evie (1945). The song ranked in the top five of the Record Buying Guide of Billboard, a pre-retail listing which surveyed primarily the jukebox industry. Recordings by Tommy Dorsey, Artie Shaw, and Frankie Masters propelled the song during its initial popularity.

  • Autumn Leaves

    Autumn Leaves is a much-recorded popular song. Originally it was a 1945 French song "Les Feuilles mortes" (literally "The Dead Leaves") with music by Joseph Kosma and lyrics by poet Jacques Prevert. Yves Montand (with Irene Joachim) introduced "Les feuilles mortes" in 1946 in the film Les Portes de la Nuit. The American songwriter Johnny Mercer wrote English lyrics in 1947 and Jo Stafford was among the first to perform this version. Autumn Leaves became a pop standard and a jazz standard in both languages and both as an instrumental and with a singer.

  • Beer Barrel Polka

    Beer Barrel Polka, also known as Roll Out the Barrel, is a song which became popular worldwide during World War II. The music was composed by the Czech musician Jaromír Vejvoda in 1927. Eduard Ingriš wrote the first arrangement of the piece, after Vejvoda came upon the melody and sought Ingriš's help in refining it. At that time, it was played without lyrics as Modřanská polka ("Polka of Modřany"). Its first text was written later (in 1934) by Václav Zeman – with the title Škoda lásky ("Wasted Love").

  • Bingo

    Bingo, also known as "Bingo Was His Name-O" and "There Was a Farmer Who Had a Dog", is an English language children's song of obscure origin. In most modern forms, the song involves spelling the name of a dog, and with increasing letters replaced with handclaps on each repetition. It has a Roud Folk Song Index number of 589.

  • Black Orpheus

    Black Orpheus - (Portuguese: Orfeu Negro) is a 1959 film made in Brazil by French director Marcel Camus. It is based on the play Orfeu da Conceição by Vinicius de Moraes, which is an adaptation of the Greek legend of Orpheus and Eurydice, setting it in the modern context of a favela in Rio de Janeiro during the Carnaval. The film was an international co-production between production companies in Brazil, France and Italy.

  • Blue Bossa

    Blue Bossa is an instrumental jazz composition by Kenny Dorham (August 30, 1924 – December 5, 1972). It was introduced on Joe Henderson's 1963 album Page One. A blend of hard bop and bossa nova, the tune was possibly influenced by Dorham's visit to the Rio de Janeiro Jazz Festival in 1961. The tune has since been recorded numerous times by different artists, making it a jazz standard.

  • Blue Skies

    Blue Skies is a popular song, written by Irving Berlin in 1926.

    The song was composed in 1926 as a last minute addition to the Rodgers and Hart musical, Betsy. Although the show only ran for 39 performances, "Blue Skies" was an instant success, with audiences on opening night demanding 24 encores of the piece from star, Belle Baker. During the final repetition, Ms. Baker forgot her lyrics, prompting Berlin to sing them from his seat in the front row.

  • Bluesette

    Jean “Toots” Thielemans was born in Brussels, Belgium on April, 29 1922. He played accordion at the age of 3 and started playing harmonica as a hobby. His first guitar, won on a bet.

  • Brown Eyed Girl

    Brown Eyed Girl is a song by Northern Irish singer-songwriter Van Morrison. Written and recorded in 1967 by Van Morrison and produced by Bang Records chief Bert Berns, it was first released in May 1967 on the album Blowin' Your Mind!. When released as a single, it rose to number eight on the Cashbox charts, and reached number ten on the Billboard Hot 100. It featured the Sweet Inspirations singing back-up vocals and is widely considered to be Van Morrison's signature song.

  • Call Me

    Call Me (a Tony Hatch composition first recorded by Petula Clark) was the first single released from his 1966 A&M album, The More I See You. The title single from the album, sung in a soft, very high tenor range and played on primarily adult-formatted radio stations, confused some  disc jockeys, who were unfamiliar with Montez's past work. The song became enormously popular and has been used many times in movies, notablyFrantic, starring Harrison Ford. When announcing the song, the DJs would often refer to Montez as a female. But by the time the album was released, Montez's pictures on the front and back of the jacket cleared up any mystery surrounding his sex, as explained in the album's notes on the back of the record jacket.

  • Classical Gas

    Classical Gas is an instrumental piece of music written by Mason Williams. The title of the album on which it appears is also Classical Gas. This song was originally released by Mason Williams on "The Mason Williams Phonograph Record" released in 1968.

  • Cute

    Neal Hefti (October 29, 1922 – October 11, 2008) was an American jazz trumpeter, composer, tune writer, and arranger. He was perhaps best known for composing the theme music for the Batman television series of the 1960s, and for scoring the 1968 film The Odd Couple and the subsequent TV series of the same name.

  • Danny Boy

    Danny Boy is a ballad written by Frederic Weatherly and usually set to the tune of the "Londonderry Air". It is most closely associated with Irish communities.

    The words to "Danny Boy" were written by English lawyer and lyricist Frederic Weatherly in 1910. Although the lyrics were originally written for a different tune, Weatherly modified them to fit the "Londonderry Air" in 1913, after his sister-in-law in the U.S. sent him a copy.

  • Don't Get Around Much Anymore

    Don't Get Around Much Anymore is a jazz standard with music by Duke Ellington and lyrics by Bob Russell. The tune was originally titled "Never No Lament" and was first recorded by Ellington in 1940 as a big band instrumental. Russell's lyrics and the new title were added in 1942.

  • Eleanor Rigby

    Eleanor Rigby is a song by The Beatles, originally released on the 1966 album Revolver. The song was primarily written by Paul McCartney, although in an interview conducted with Playboy magazine in 1980, John Lennon claimed that "the first verse was his and the rest are basically mine." Pete Shotton, a close friend of Lennon who was present at the time, said "Though John (whose memory could be extremely erratic) was to take credit, in one of his last interviews, for most of the lyrics, my own recollection is that 'Eleanor Rigby' was one 'Lennon-McCartney' classic in which John's contribution was virtually nil." McCartney also says that Lennon helped on about "half a line". It remains one of the Beatles' most recognizable and unique songs, with a double string quartet arrangement by George Martin and its striking lyrics about loneliness, continuing the transformation of the Beatles started in Rubber Soul from a mainly pop-oriented act to a more serious and experimental studio band.

  • Feliz Navidad

    Feliz Navidad is a Christmas song written in 1970 by the Puerto Rican singer-songwriter José Feliciano. With its simple Spanish chorus (the traditional Christmas/New Year greeting, "Feliz Navidad, próspero año y felicidad" or "Merry Christmas, prosperous year and happiness") and equally simple English verse ("I wanna wish you a Merry Christmas from the bottom of my heart"), it has become a classic Christmas pop song in the United States, Canada and throughout the Spanish-speaking world.

  • Finding Love

    Original song by Curt Sheller.

  • Fly Me to the Moon

    Fly Me to the Moon is a popular standard song written by Bart Howard in 1954. It was titled originally "In Other Words", and was introduced by Felicia Sanders in cabarets. The song became known popularly as "Fly Me to the Moon" from its first line, and after a few years the publishers changed the title to that officially.

  • Giant Steps

    Giant Steps is a jazz composition by John Coltrane, first appearing as the first track on the album of the same name (1960). The composition is a milestone in jazz, given the difficulty of improvising its rapid progression of chord changes that progress through three keys (see Coltrane changes) shifted by major thirds, creating an augmented triad..

    The song title comes from the relatively giant leaps between the roots of consecutive chords. From a transcription, one can easily infer that many of these are upward leaps of minor thirds, but they can just as easily be inverted as descending major sixths, the latter approach best accentuating the disconcerting nature of the progression..

  • Girl From Ipanema

    The Girl from Ipanema (Garota de Ipanema) is an essential jazz standard that every jazz musiciian should know. The A sections chord progression, basically a I II7 II V is functionally the same as Take the A Train, Jersey Bounce, Desifando and a few others.

    The Girl from Ipanema ("Garota de Ipanema") is a well-known bossa nova song, a worldwide hit in the mid-1960s that won a Grammy for Record of the Year in 1965. It was written in 1962, with music by Antonio Carlos Jobim and Portuguese lyrics by Vinicius de Moraes with English lyrics written later by Norman Gimbel. When sung by female artists it is typically rendered as "The Boy from Ipanema".

  • Happy Birthday

    Happy Birthday to You, also known more simply as Happy Birthday, is a song that is traditionally sung to celebrate the anniversary of a person's birth. According to the 1998 Guinness Book of World Records, "Happy Birthday to You" is the most recognized song in the English language, followed by "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" and "Auld Lang Syne". The song's base lyrics have been translated into at least 18 languages.

  • Heat Wave

    Heat Wave is a 1963 hit single by Holland–Dozier–Holland made popular by Motown girl group Martha and the Vandellas on the Gordy (Motown) label and later by Rock vocalist Linda Ronstadt from her Platinum-selling 1975 album Prisoner in Disguise. It is sometimes called "(Love Is Like A) Heat Wave," although that was not the title on the 1963 single.

  • How High the Moon

    How High the Moon is a jazz standard with lyrics by Nancy Hamilton and music by Morgan Lewis. It was first featured in the 1940 Broadway revue Two for the Show, where it was sung by Alfred Drake and Frances Comstock.

  • How Insensitive

    "Insensatez" (usually translated to "How Insensitive" in English, although the Portuguese word really means 'absurdity' or 'folly') is a bossa nova jazz standard composed by Antônio Carlos Jobim, loosely based on Frédéric Chopin's Prelude No.4 with lyrics by Vinícius de Moraes. The English lyrics were written by Norman Gimbel.

  • I’ll Remember April

    The music was written by Gene de Paul with the lyrics by Patricia Johnston and Don Raye. The song was published in 1942. It was once sung by Judy Garland. The song debuted in the 1942 Abbott and Costello comedy Ride ‘Em Cowboy, sung by Dick Foran.

  • Inspector Gadget

    Inspector Gadget is an animated television series about a clumsy, absent-minded, and oblivious detective, Inspector Gadget, who is a cyborg with various "gadgets" built into his anatomy.

    The theme music for the show was composed by Shuki Levy & Haim Saban. Both of them composed background music for this show and many other DiC cartoons of the 1980s.

  • Irish Washerwoman

    The Irish Washerwoman is a traditional Irish jig whose melody is familiar to many people in the British Isles and North America. It repeats its refrain several times, sometimes by gradually increasing in tempo until being played very fast before coming to a sudden stop. The tune has lyrics, but is typically rendered as an instrumental. It is one of the melodies played when Scottish highland dancers dance a Scottish dance to the tune of an Irish Jig.

  • Joy Spring

    Clifford Brown (October 30, 1930 – June 26, 1956), aka "Brownie," was an influential and highly rated American jazz trumpeter.

    • Ukulele and Guitar solo arrangements.
    • Play-Along MP3 Track and Lead Sheet

  • Kelle Belle

    An original jazz blues or my daughter Kelly from my Midnight at the Jazz Cafe CD.

  • Light My Fire

    Light My Fire is a song by The Doors which was recorded in August 1966 and released the first week of January 1967 on the Doors' debut album. Released as a single in April, it spent three weeks at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, and one week on the Cash Box Top 100, nearly a year after its recording. A year later, it re-entered the Billboard Hot 100 in 1968 following the success of Jose Feliciano's version of the song, peaking at number 87. The song was largely written by Robby Krieger, and credited to the entire band. The single was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America in 1967, representing sales of one million units.

  • Midnight Cafe

    Original song by Curt Sheller from my CD Midnight at the Jazz Cafe. A minor blues in Fm.

    Midnight at the Jazz Cafe uses more contemporary 4-part chords.

  • Misty

    Misty "Misty" is a jazz standard written in 1954 by the pianist Erroll Garner.

    Originally composed as an instrumental following the traditional 32-bar format, the tune later had lyrics by Johnny Burke and became the signature song of Johnny Mathis, reaching #12 on the U.S. Pop Singles chart in 1959. It has been covered numerous times, perhaps most notably by Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan (1959), Frank Sinatra and Earl Grant (1961), Lloyd Price (1963), and also by Ray Stevens (1975) as a country song. It was also used as a theme song for NBC's Today Show for most of the 1960s.

  • Moon River

    Moon River is a song composed by Johnny Mercer (lyrics) and Henry Mancini (music) in 1961, for whom it won that year's Academy Award for Best Original Song. It was originally sung in the movie Breakfast at Tiffany's by Audrey Hepburn, although it has been covered by many other artists. The song also won the 1962 Grammy Award for Record of the Year.

  • Moondance

    Moondance is a popular song written by Northern Irish singer-songwriter Van Morrison and is the title song on his 1970 album Moondance.

    Morrison did not release the song as a single until November 1977, seven and a half years after the album was released. It reached the Billboard Hot 100, charting at #92. The single's B-side, "Cold Wind in August" had been released in the same year, on his latest album at the time, A Period of Transition.

  • My Favorite Things

    My Favorite Things is a show tune from the 1959 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The Sound of Music.

    The song was first introduced by Mary Martin in the original Broadway production, and sung by Julie Andrews in the 1965 film adaptation.

    In the musical, the lyrics to the song are a litany of things that Maria loves, such as "raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens, bright copper kettles and warm woolen mittens." These are the things she selects to fill her mind with when times get bad and sad.

  • Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da

    Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da is a song credited to Lennon–McCartney, but written by Paul McCartney and released by The Beatles on their 1968 album The Beatles (also referred to as The White Album). It was released as a single that same year in many countries, but not in the United Kingdom, nor in the United States until 1976.

    Paul McCartney wrote the song around the time that highlife and reggae were beginning to become popular in Britain. The tag line "ob-la-di, ob-la-da, life goes on, bra" was an expression that Nigerian conga player Jimmy Scott-Emuakpor, an acquaintance of McCartney, used.

  • Oh! Susanna

    Oh! Susanna is a minstrel song by Stephen Foster (1826-1864). It was published by W. C. Peters & Co. in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1848. The song was introduced by a local quintette at a concert in Andrews' Eagle Ice Cream Saloon in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on September 11, 1847. Foster was said to have written the song for his men's social club. The name Susannah may refer to Foster's deceased sister Charlotte, whose middle name was Susannah. Glenn Weiser suggests the song was influenced by an existing work, "Rose of Alabama" (1846), with which it shares some similarities in lyrical theme and musical structure.

  • Old MacDonald Had a Farm

    Old MacDonald Had a Farm is a children's song and nursery rhyme about a farmer named MacDonald (or McDonald, Macdonald) and the various animals he keeps on his farm. Each verse of the song changes the name of the animal and its respective noise. In many versions, the song is cumulative, with the noises from all the earlier verses added to each subsequent verse.[1] It has a Roud Folk Song Index number of 745.

  • Pink Panther

    The Pink Panther Theme is an instrumental composition by Henry Mancini written as the theme for the 1963 film The Pink Panther and subsequently nominated for the 1964 Academy Award for Original Music Score. The cartoon character created for the opening credits of the movie by David DePatie and Friz Freleng was animated in time to the tune. The soloist of this song was Plas Johnson.

  • QuickStart Aeolian Play-along Tracks

    The playalong tracks from the QuickStart Chord Progressions for Lead Guitar. These tracks are suitable for any instruments.

  • QuickStart Dorian Play-along Tracks

    The playalong tracks from the QuickStart Chord Progressions for Lead Guitar. These tracks are suitable for any instruments.

  • QuickStart Ionian Play-along Tracks

    The playalong tracks from the QuickStart Chord Progressions for Lead Guitar. These tracks are suitable for any instruments.

  • QuickStart Mixolydian Play-along Tracks

    The playalong tracks from the QuickStart Chord Progressions for Lead Guitar. These tracks are suitable for any instruments.

  • QuickStart Pentatonic Play-along Tracks

    The playalong tracks from the QuickStart Chord Progressions for Lead Guitar. These tracks are suitable for any instruments.

  • QuickStart Progressions Blues Tracks

    QuickStart Chord Progressions play-along Blues Shuffle track in the Key of A.

  • Red River Valley

    Red River Valley is a folk song and cowboy music standard of controversial origins that has gone by different names—e.g., "Cowboy Love Song", "Bright Sherman Valley", "Bright Laurel Valley", "In the Bright Mohawk Valley", and "Bright Little Valley"—depending on where it has been sung. It is listed as Roud Folk Song Index 756, and by Edith Fowke as FO 13. It is recognizable by its chorus (with several variations):

  • Sailors Hornpipe

    The Sailor's Hornpipe (also known as The College Hornpipe and Jack's the Lad) is a traditional hornpipe melody.

    The tune was played in the animated Popeye cartoons beginning in the 1930s, usually as the first part of the opening credits theme, which then segued into an instrumental of "I'm Popeye the Sailor Man".

  • Satin Doll

    Satin Doll - is a jazz standard written by Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn with lyrics by Johnny Mercer. Written in 1953, the song has been recorded countless times, by such artists as Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra, 101 Strings, and Nancy Wilson. Its chord progression is well known for its unusual use of chords and opening with a ii-V-I turnaround.

  • Shiny Stockings

    A melody and chord arrangement of the Frank Foster song for ukulele in G Tuning with a low "D" tuning "D G B E".

  • Site Membership Songs

    All site members have access to all songs with or without premium play-along tracks.

    Simply go the song's page, and if Signed IN in you have access to any downloads for that song.

  • Solar

    Solar is a musical composition attributed to Miles Davis on the studio album Walkin' (1954), considered a modern jazz standard. The tune has been played and recorded by many musicians including his former bandmates/collaborators Lee Konitz, Bill Evans, Dave Holland, Keith Jarrett or Jack DeJohnette.

  • Someday My Prince Will Come

    Some Day My Prince Will Come is a popular song from Walt Disney's 1937 animated movie Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. It was written by Larry Morey (lyrics) & Frank Churchill (music), and performed by Adriana Caselotti (Snow White's voice in the movie). It was also featured in the 1979 stage adaptation of the 1937 animated musical movie. In AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs, it was ranked as the 19th greatest film song of all time.

  • Somewhere Over the Rainbow

    Over the Rainbow (often referred to as "Somewhere Over the Rainbow") is a classic ballad song with music by Harold Arlen and lyrics by E.Y. Harburg. It was written for the movie The Wizard of Oz, and was sung by Judy Garland in that movie.

  • Spain

    Spain is an instrumental jazz fusion composition by jazz pianist and composer Chick Corea. It is probably Corea's most prominent piece, and some would consider it a modern jazz standard.

    Spain was composed in 1971 and appeared in its original (and most well-known) rendition on the album Light as a Feather, with performances by Corea (Rhodes electric piano), Airto Moreira (drums), Flora Purim (vocals and percussion), Stanley Clarke (bass), and Joe Farrell (flute). It has been recorded in several versions, by Corea himself as well as by other artists.

  • St. Thomas

    St. Thomas - This is perhaps the most recognizable instrumental in the repertoire of American jazz tenor saxophonist Sonny Rollins, who is usually credited as its composer. However, it is actually based on a traditional nursery song from the Virgin Islands, which Rollins' mother sang to him when he was a child. As such, it has a distinct Caribbean vibe to it.

  • Stairway to Heaven

    Stairway to Heaven is a song by the English rock band Led Zeppelin, released in late 1971. It was composed by guitarist Jimmy Page and vocalist Robert Plant for the band's untitled fourth studio album (usually referred to as Led Zeppelin IV). The song, running eight minutes and two seconds, is composed of several sections, which increase in tempo and volume as the song progresses. The song begins as a slow acoustic-based folk song accompanied by panflutes, before electric instrumentation is introduced. The final section is a high-tempo hard rock section highlighted by an intricate guitar solo by Page.

  • Star Spangled Banner

    The Star-Spangled Banner is the national anthem of the United States of America. The lyrics come from a poem written in 1814 by Francis Scott Key, a then 35-year-old amateur poet who wrote "Defence of Fort McHenry" after seeing the bombardment of Fort McHenry at Baltimore, Maryland, by Royal Navy ships in Chesapeake Bay during the War of 1812.

  • Summer Samba

    Summer Samba (also known as So Nice or its original Portuguese title, "Samba de Verão") is a 1964 bossa nova song by Brazilian composer Marcos Valle, with English-language lyrics by Norman Gimbel; the original Portuguese lyrics came from Paulo Sérgio Valle, brother to the composer.

  • Sunny

    Sunny is the name of a song written by Bobby Hebb. It is one of the most covered popular songs, with hundreds of versions released. BMI rates "Sunny" number 25 in its "Top 100 songs of the century".

    Hebb wrote the song after 22 November 1963, the day after U.S. President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, Hebb's older brother Harold was killed in a knife fight outside a Nashville nightclub. Hebb was devastated by both events and many critics say that those events inspired the tune. Others claims Bobby wrote the song for God. Certainly, events influenced Bobby's songwriting, but his timeless melody, crossing over into R&B (#3 on U.S. R&B chart) Country and Pop (#2 on U.S. Pop chart), together with the optimistic lyrics, came from the artist's desire to express that one should always "look at the bright side" - a direct quote from the author. Hebb has said about "Sunny":

  • Super Mario Bros - Main Theme

    Super Mario Bros is a 1985 platform video game developed by Nintendo, published for the Nintendo Entertainment System as a sequel to the 1983 game Mario Bros.

  • Super Mario Bros - Underwater Theme

    Super Mario Bros is a 1985 platform video game developed by Nintendo, published for the Nintendo Entertainment System as a sequel to the 1983 game Mario Bros.

  • Super Mario Bros - Underworld Theme

    Super Mario Bros is a 1985 platform video game developed by Nintendo, published for the Nintendo Entertainment System as a sequel to the 1983 game Mario Bros.

  • Sway

    Sway is the English version of "¿Quién será?", a 1953 mambo song by Mexican composer and bandleader Pablo Beltrán Ruiz. In 1954 the English lyrics were written by Norman Gimbel and recorded by Dean Martin (his recording reached number fifteen on the Billboard magazine best-seller chart and number six on the UK chart).

  • Take Five

    Take Five is a jazz piece written by Paul Desmond and performed by The Dave Brubeck Quartet on their 1959 album Time Out. Recorded at Columbia's 30th Street Studios in New York City on June 25, July 1, and August 18, 1959, this piece became one of the group's best-known records. It is famous for its distinctive catchy saxophone melody; imaginative, jolting drum solo; and use of the unusual quintuple (5/4) time, from which its name is derived. The song was first played to a live audience by The Dave Brubeck Quartet at the Village Gate nightclub in New York City in 1959.

  • The Lion Sleeps Tonight

    The Lion Sleeps Tonight, also known as “Wimba Way” or “Wimoweh” (and originally as "Mbube"), is a song written and recorded by Solomon Linda originally with the Evening Birds (Song by Solomon Linda originally titled just "Mbube") for the South African Gallo Record Company in 1939. Originally composed only in IsiZulu, it was adapted and covered internationally by many 1950s pop and folk revival artists, including The Weavers, Jimmy Dorsey, Yma Sumac, Miriam Makeba, and The Kingston Trio. In 1961, it became a number one hit in the U.S. as adapted in English by the doo-wop group The Tokens. It went on to earn at least US $15 million in royalties from covers and film licensing.

  • There Will Never Be Another You

    There Will Never Be Another You is a popular song with music by Harry Warren and lyrics by Mack Gordon for the Twentieth Century Fox musical Iceland (1942) starring Sonja Henie. The song was published in 1942, and is one of the most widely known and performed standards of the jazz repertoire.

  • This Train

    This Train (is Bound for Glory) by Woody Guthrie.

  • Walk Don't Run

    Walk Don't Run is a rock'n'roll instrumental composition written and first performed by Johnny Smith in 1955. It became a hit single in the autumn of 1960 for the Seattle-based instrumental rock band The Ventures. In the UK, the tune was covered by the John Barry Seven, whose version, while only peaking at #11 on the Record Retailer chart, compared with the Ventures' #8, outcharted them to reach the Top 10 on other UK charts such as that of the NME.

  • Wave

    Wave (also known as "Vou Te Contar" in Portuguese) is a song written by Antonio Carlos Jobim. Recorded as an instrumental on Jobim's 1967 album of the same name, English lyrics were added by Jobim for a November 11, 1969 recording by Frank Sinatra, released on his 1970 album Sinatra & Company.

  • West Coast Blues

    A jazz classic by the last jazz guitarist Wes Montgomery. Wes is widely considered one of the major jazz guitarists, emerging after such seminal figures as Django Reinhardt and Charlie Christian and influencing countless others, including George Benson, Kenny Burrell, Grant Green, Jimi Hendrix, Steve Howe, Russell Malone, Pat Martino, Pat Metheny, Randy Napoleon, and Emily Remler.

  • What's New

  • While My Guitar Gently Weeps

    While My Guitar Gently Weeps is a song written by George Harrison of The Beatles for their double album The Beatles (also known as The White Album).

    The song was ranked #135 on Rolling Stone's list of the 500 greatest songs of all time and #7 on their list of the 100 greatest guitar songs of all time.

  • Witchcraft

    Witchcraft is a popular song from 1957 composed by Cy Coleman with lyrics by Carolyn Leigh. It was released as a single by Frank Sinatra, and reached number twenty in the U.S., spending sixteen weeks on the charts.

  • Yesterday

    Yesterday is a song originally recorded by The Beatles for their 1965 album Help!. The song first hit the United Kingdom top 10 three months after the release of Help!. The song remains popular today with more than 1,600 cover versions, one of the most covered songs in the history of recorded music. The song was not released as a single in the UK at the time of its release in the United States, and thus never gained number 1 single status in that country. However, "Yesterday" was voted the best song of the 20th century in a 1999 BBC Radio 2 poll of music experts and listeners. In 2000, "Yesterday" was voted the #1 Pop song of all time by MTV and Rolling Stone magazine. In 1997, the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. Broadcast Music Incorporated (BMI) asserts that it was performed over seven million times in the 20th century alone.

  • You Are The Sunshine of My Life

    You Are the Sunshine of My Life is a 1973 R&B pop single released by Stevie Wonder. The song became Wonder's third #1 single on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and his first #1 on the Easy Listening chart. It won Wonder a Grammy Award for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance. This song was the second single released from the 1972 album entitled Talking Book. The song opened 194 Radio City on 21 October 1974.

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Content is always being added and updated. So check-in often. Thanks, Curt

Over 500+ lessons, 54 songs and TABS, 240+ archtop luthiers, 200+ ukulele builders, festival information, ukulele links on the web. On the web since the early 90's and growing everyday. This site just never stops growing!!!

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